Yan's Corner - In Touch

Monday, March 28, 2005

Personality Test

Ever done any personality test?

Remember the test that asks you to put in order your preference of five animals, namely, pig, horse, cow, sheep, tiger? If you have chosen the pig as your first preference, you are a money person.

Then the test goes on to ask you to use a word to describe sea, coffee, cat, dog and mouse? If you have said coffee is tempting, it means your perspective of sex is tempting. If you say the sea is uncertain, then it represents that your life is uncertain...

I remember that and when I have just finished the test, I thought, that really reads my heart. But, when I have chance to think it over, the test is set to trap anyone. Anyone will think it's really amazing.

Or have you done The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which measures four qualities of a person -- introversion/extroversion, sensing/intuition, thinking/feeling, judging/perceiving?

The star has set up a poll to analyse the reasons why the graduates are unemployed few days ago. According to the poll results, there is a graduate who went for 100 interviews and still have not found a job.

Incidentally, The Washington Post carried an article on employers relying on personality test to screen applicants.

It reported that even before the candidates stepped through the door for the interview, their fate had been largely determined by a computer. They had taken a 50-minute online test that asked them to rate to what degree they agreed or disagreed with statements such as, "It's maddening when the court lets guilty criminals go free," "You don't worry about making a good impression" and "You could describe yourself as 'tidy'."

A score in the "green" range for customer service gave an applicant an 83 percent chance of getting hired, "yellow" a 16 percent chance and "red" a 1 percent chance.

The paper further reported that a recent survey found that about 30 percent of all companies use personality tests in hiring.

To many companies, the tests are as important, if not more important, than an applicant's education, experience and recommendations.

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which measures four qualities of a person -- introversion/extroversion, sensing/intuition, thinking/feeling, judging/perceiving -- is often used to help match people up with careers.

But Dan P. McAdams, a professor of psychology and human development at Northwestern Unviersity certainly does not agree with the personality. He said, "You are really doing a disservice to the complexity of human individuality."

Perhaps, The Star can set up another poll for the employers whether they are using personality test to determine the fate of the candidates.

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